CoSN Refreshes Acceptable Use Policy Guide for School Districts

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) has issued a refreshed acceptable use policy (AUP) guide, titled “Rethinking Acceptable Use Policies to Enable Digital Learning: A Guide for School Districts.”
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The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) has issued a refreshed acceptable use policy (AUP) guide, titled “Rethinking Acceptable Use Policies to Enable Digital Learning: A Guide for School Districts.”

The AUP Guide addresses the following eight key questions:

1. How does policy differ from procedure, and does the difference matter?

2. What federal laws regulate Internet use in schools? 

3. What state laws regulate Internet use in schools?

4. What are two ways that school districts develop or revise the AUP?

5. When – how often – should school district AUPs be updated?

6. What are the implications of moving from an acceptable use policy to a responsible use policy?

7. Where can you find samples of AUPs?

8. What are some timely, relevant and useful resources pertaining to the use of digital media for learning?

In its responses, the guide provides information, solutions, guidance and examples of districts nationwide – from Katy Independent School District (TX) to Warwick School District (PA) – that have implemented effective digital media policies.

To access the guide at no cost, visit: www.cosn.org/AUPguide.

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