Copyright: Giving Credit - Tech Learning

Copyright: Giving Credit

I’m really trying to help teachers and students adhere to the copyright policy. One issue is properly citing resources in students’ multimedia presentations. The teachers are having difficulty in getting students to use the proper format to do this. Any suggestions? David Warlick’s Landmarks for Schools Web
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I’m really trying to help teachers and students adhere to the copyright policy. One issue is properly citing resources in students’ multimedia presentations. The teachers are having difficulty in getting students to use the proper format to do this. Any suggestions?

David Warlick’s Landmarks for Schools Web site offers a free online tool, called Citation Machine that may be just the ticket. Students can open the tool, select the type of resource they want to cite, enter the “raw†information requested (author, publisher, etc.), and then click on Make Citations. The result is a proper citation in both MLA and APA formats. Students can then copy and paste the format into their bibliography (they will have to do the proper indenting on their own, but there’s an explanation about how to do that). The beauty of Citation Machine is that it handles online and electronic sources as well as print, so students who use the Web or a CD-Rom encyclopedia as a reference can still follow proper citation protocols.

Try Citation Machine yourself.

Submitted by: Susan Brooks-Young

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