Green Laptops Available at Co-op Pricing - Tech Learning

Green Laptops Available at Co-op Pricing

Toshiba's Digital Products Division has announced the availability of its laptop computers through WSCA (Western States Contracting Alliance).
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Toshiba's Digital Products Division (DPD), has announced the availability of its laptop computers through WSCA (Western States Contracting Alliance)/NASPO (National Association of State Procurement Officials) Master Purchase Agreement #B27176.

Participating states join together in cooperative multi-state contracting, which combines volume purchases for greater pricing concessions. Each state leads their own procurement, issues the solicitation, and awards the contracts based on that state's statutory requirements and processes. Participating states may allow Toshiba's WSCA/NASPO authorized resellers to sell Toshiba product under the contract. In addition, WSCA/NASPO purchasing entities are able to buy direct from Toshiba and name an authorized Toshiba Preferred Partner Reseller as an agent.

In alignment with the WSCA/NASPO program, Toshiba offers products that are EPEAT Gold and Silver Certified. The company has achieved the Green Electronics Council's Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool's (EPEAT) highest rating of Gold status on five of its laptop computers. Additionally, Toshiba offers a free electronic recycling and trade-in program and reduces bulk packaging to minimize waste, as well as prefers suppliers who have met stringent environmental standards for procurement.

For more information, visit http://laptops.toshiba.com/wsca

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