Stages of Concern - Tech Learning

Stages of Concern

Tip: As a professional developer, you are a change-agent. Adults react to innovation in different stages of the Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM) according to Hall and Rutherford (1979)1 and review of literature on CBAM by Loucks-Horsley (1996)2. As a change agent, you can use this model to identify and
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Tip:
As a professional developer, you are a change-agent. Adults react to innovation in different stages of the Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM) according to Hall and Rutherford (1979)1 and review of literature on CBAM by Loucks-Horsley (1996)2. As a change agent, you can use this model to identify and interpret their stage of concern, especially their attitude about using technology.

Awareness

may know or not know about the technology, but is not ready, even if has access to it

Informational

aware of the technology, wants to learn more, and may ask lots of questions before jumping in

Personal

uses technology for personal use and may ask WIIFM (What’s In It For Me?) – may have general anxiety about using technology beyond personal use

Management

uses technology regularly but has trouble finding and organizing files, folders, and programs

Consequence

looking for ways that technology will impact student learning

Collaboration

interested in using technology as a collaborative tool with students and other teachers

Refocusing

willing to share and teach other teachers how to use technology with students

As part of the coaching program, I suggest working with mentors to determine which teachers are at what level. Another way is to ask your teachers to take an online survey at Stages of Concern Instrument to determine their attitude about instructional technology:

1Hall, G. E., George, A. A., & Rutherford, W. L. (1979). Measuring stages of concerns about the innovation: A manual for use of the SoC Questionnaire. Austin, TX: The University of Texas at Austin, The Research and Development Center for Teacher Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction No. ED 147 342) 2Houcks-Horsley, S. (1996) Professional Development for Science Education: A Critical and Immediate Challenge. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co.Submitted by:Barbara BrayNext Tip: Guiding Change for the Awareness Stage

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