The Motley Fool

Name:The Motley Fool (opens in new tab)

Brief Description of the Site:
The Motley Fool states it exists to educate, amuse, and enrich the individual investor; to prove to you that the best person to manage your money is YOU. That may or may not be true, but the site is a wealth of information (pardon the financial pun). Today's news drama is in the financial world and what better way to learn than with a virtual visit with The Motley Fool. The link to "Fool's School" is irresistible with 13 steps to investing, a Getting Started back to financial basics section, Personal Finance, Investing, and Products and Services. This is an excellent learning tool with popup charts to allow one to compare actual spending with desired spending. Data entered can be interpreted through using input and then clicking on "results" or "graphs" to analyze spending habits. This can be most instructive for middle or high school students wishing to acquire a better grasp of the financial world.

How to use the site:
The Foolish Calculators section includes Frequently Asked Questions (FAQS) that allows one to generate graphs with the data entered. The easiest way to navigate such as an extensive site is through the site map. While the list of economic topics seems endless, the site map does organize information in a way that allows accessibility with ease. The tool bar that remains on the site of each page also includes links to financial news. To find out what the experts thinks, one might start with the News and Commentary Features. Site visitors can send in questions, learn more about taxes on investments, and just about any topic related to investing or saving. The listserv is available for free with market updates and analysis through email. Motley Fool is a comprehensive primer that educators can use to develop a whole financial or economics curriculum on the free market economy. Middle school students might need some assistance in interpreting information gleaned from the site, but it's an excellent place to introduce economics to students.

Submitted by:
Anonymous