Today's Newsletter: Making Time for Genius - Tech Learning

Today's Newsletter: Making Time for Genius

“Genius Hours” (#GeniusHour)— where students are allowed to explore their own passions for 20% of their time—have proven to be an effective method to inspire students.
Author:
Publish date:

Genius Hours” (#GeniusHour)— where students are allowed to explore their own passions for 20% of their time—have proven to be an effective method to inspire students. Brenda Valencia, a bilingual Southern California educator for 22 years, writes in a recent guest post: “When I took the risk of releasing control of student learning in my class, I realized how I’ve been a hindrance all along.” AJ Juliani ‏(@ajjuliani) tweets: "Really cool seeing @WadeKing7 class doing #geniushour - give kids choice and watch amazing happen!” T&L advisor Adam Schoenbart writes about a Genius Hour idea from one of his students, Lauren Herran, in which she suggested a redesigned learning space. She writes, “Due to the final product that I created, I have improved as a future architect. With these skills and knowledge, Genius Hour is something that will help me in the future.” Schoenbart also reports on the value of reflection in Genius Hours as educators fine-tune its role in their teaching. Despite the many reported successes with this approach, a recent T&L poll found just 25% of our readers said they had tried a Genius Hour, and 34% hadn’t heard of it. In your jam-packed curriculum, have you been able to carve out 20% for open exploration? –Christine Weiser, Executive Editor

Featured

Related

Today's Newsletter:  Khan Goes Brick & Mortar promo image

Today's Newsletter: Khan Goes Brick & Mortar

“We view the virtual as something that can empower the physical — that if students can get lectures at their own time and pace, they can get exercises, they can have a programming platform, that doesn't mean that the classroom gets replaced; it means the classroom gets liberated.”

Moving Forward promo image

Today's Newsletter: The Power of Story

Cara Jones, founder of Storytellers for Good, prompted attendees, 50 or so school district executives from around the country, to play a game of telephone—share their own personal story in two short minutes, listen to each other’s story, then turn to repeat their partner’s story to a new partner.