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Study: K-12 Online and Blended Learning Headed in Different Directions - Tech Learning

Study: K-12 Online and Blended Learning Headed in Different Directions

New research shows that K-12 online and blended learning evolved in new directions in 2011, with the rise and rapid growth of new consortium and single-district programs outstripping the continued expansion of more traditional elearning programs.
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New research shows that K-12 online and blended learning evolved in new directions in 2011, with the rise and rapid growth of new consortium and single-district programs outstripping the continued expansion of more traditional elearning programs. This trend and other K-12 online and blended learning developments are revealed in the new report, 2011 Keeping Pace with Online K-12 Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice, from the Evergreen Education Group. Keeping Pace was unveiled today at the 2011 Virtual School Symposium hosted by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL).

Now in its eighth year, Keeping Pace tracks the latest developments in K-12 online learning policy and practice, including student enrollments, online program counts and other implementation metrics. In addition, the study provides policy profiles on each of the 50 states, and also rates them in six categories of online learning: full-time and supplemental online options for high school, middle school and elementary school students. Finally, Keeping Pace identifies key implementation and policy trends in both online and blended learning. The complete Keeping Pace with Online K-12 Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice can be found online at http://kpk12.com.

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