A Cell's Fate - Tech Learning

A Cell's Fate

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This article describes how the single cell of a fertilized egg develops into a human embryo. In particular, it describes the class of cells known as stem cells. Stem cells have two features that make them unlike any other cell: They can make identical copies of themselves, and they can make differentiated-specialized-cells such as nerve cells or muscle cells. The article also discusses differences between two kinds of stem cells-embryonic and adult.

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A Cell's Fate

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