Do We Really Need Student Technology Standards? - Tech Learning

Do We Really Need Student Technology Standards?

Our new state technology plan format requires that the district provide a separate scope and sequence for student technology skills. I thought the whole idea was to embed these skills in content area teaching. Am I mistaken? Although students today are tech-savvy in many ways, most still require direct instruction
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Our new state technology plan format requires that the district provide a separate scope and sequence for student technology skills. I thought the whole idea was to embed these skills in content area teaching. Am I mistaken?

Although students today are tech-savvy in many ways, most still require direct instruction in specific technology skills such as use of application programs, keyboarding, or efficient Internet searching strategies. When students haven’t mastered these skills, they waste valuable instructional time struggling with the mechanics of using the technology. Other issues such as copyright and Internet safety must also be addressed.

A well-written scope and sequence of the technology skills that students are expected to master at each grade level is a useful tool. It gives teachers a handle on the skills and knowledge incoming students should already have and helps them identify the specific skills that must be taught so students are prepared to successfully use technology as a learning tool in content-based activities.

For more information about student standards, visit ISTE’S National Educational Technology Standards for Students.

Submitted by: Susan Brooks-Young

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Q. Our new state technology plan format requires that the district provide a separate scope and sequence for student technology skills. I thought the whole idea was to embed these skills into content-area teaching. Am I mistaken? A. A well-written scope and sequence of the technology skills that students are expected

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