Flash-y Videos

Listen to the podcast Question: I've been seeing little video cameras that don't use tapes. How do they work? Are they any good? The IT Guy says: With the continued drop in cost for flash memory, there is a new class of video camera that's come on the market. These cameras don't use any tape at all;
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Listen to the podcast

Question: I've been seeing little video cameras that don't use tapes. How do they work? Are they any good?

The IT Guy says:
With the continued drop in cost for flash memory, there is a new class of video camera that's come on the market. These cameras don't use any tape at all; they record directly to computer memory. This allows the cameras to be very small, portable, and in some cases very inexpensive—ideal for classroom use!

A step up from the Flip devices would be the Xacti family of cameras from Sanyo. They are more expensive, starting at a street price of around $200, but they have several advantages. They have optical zoom lenses, double as 4 megapixel still cameras, and use SD memory cards for expandable storage. The higher-priced models can even record in HD. Similar cameras are also available from RCA, Aiptek, and others, with more appearing almost weekly.

So other than not packing around tapes, what is the advantage to tapeless cameras? Time! If you shoot an hour of video on a tape, it takes an hour to transfer the video to the computer for editing. With flash-based cameras, the same amount of video will take just a few minutes to copy to the computer, depending on how fast your computer is. That can be incredibly important in a time-strapped classroom! What you lose is simple back-up storage. All those tapes may take up space and be a pain to manage, but they are a way of archiving your original videos. With flash-based cameras you have to be more purposeful in backing up and archiving the videos you upload to your computer. For classroom purposes, however, it's a tradeoff I'd be willing to make!

Next Tip: Setting Music Free

Featured

Related

Video Camera Savvy

Listen to the podcast Question: We're getting ready to purchase a video camera to use in our school. Are there particular features we should be sure to look for? The IT Guy says: With the availability of great video editing software and inexpensive video cameras, creating videos as part of school

Flash Tutorial

Flash Tutorial Macromedia Flash helps put multimedia online. This site offers a tutorial on using this powerful tool. Western Knight Center for Specialized Journalism • Pictures and/or Illustrations • High School Bob Brosmer

Flash Mobbing in California

"Random acts of mass absurdity," "public displays of pure wackiness," "strange antics," "inane activities" — these are just a few of the descriptors the international press is using to define the actions of a "flash mob," the newest tech-enabled craze garnering headlines these days. In case you're out of the

Keeping Flash Drives Secure By Conn McQuinn

My USB flash drives (or thumb drives or whatever ) are really handy, but also really easy to misplace.  Is there a way to protect the files if (or when) I lose it?The good news about USB drives is that

Digital Textbooks in a Flash

My high school staff and I are considering using digital textbooks next year. One teacher mentioned a device he’d heard of that would allow the students to download the texts and take them home, but he can’t remember what it was called. Do you know anything about it?   A new USB drive called