Getting Participants' Full Attention - Tech Learning

Getting Participants' Full Attention

Tip: This tip is from the Mid-America Computers in Education (MACE) Conference in Kansas, Summer 2000. When doing a professional development session with a group of teachers who are sitting at computers, tell them that the mice are tired and need to rest when you want to get their full attention. Have them lay the
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This tip is from the Mid-America Computers in Education (MACE) Conference in Kansas, Summer 2000. When doing a professional development session with a group of teachers who are sitting at computers, tell them that the mice are tired and need to rest when you want to get their full attention. Have them lay the mouse on it's back to rest for a stretch of time. This seems to me like a light-hearted way to ask teachers to pay full attention to what you're explaining rather than have them clicking through websites or their email.

Submitted by:Janice Friesen
Area Instructional Specialist, Missouri; MOREnet, The eMINTS Project

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