HS students win aeronautics challenge - Tech Learning

HS students win aeronautics challenge

Xavier High School from Middletown, CT has won the 2010-2011 national Real World Design Challenge
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Xavier High School from Middletown, CT has won the 2010-2011 national Real World Design Challenge. High school students from across the country competed to design a next-generation airplane wing that maximizes fuel efficiency and enhances performance. The Challenge was created by engineers at NASA, the FAA and Cessna.

The corporate partners provided real world design tools to give high schools students access to all of the essentials that engineers today have to work with. PTC (based in Needham, MA) provided students access to the same design and development software used by companies like Motorola, Boeing, Nike and Vera Bradley – all with the goal of increasing interest among students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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