Learning: Is There an App for That?

The mobile media passback effect is a new phenomenon.
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

¦ The mobile media passback effect is a new phenomenon. Two thirds of children aged four to seven have used an iPhone or iPod touch, and 85 percent have used one owned by a parent. Children most often use the devices when they are “passed back” by a parent while in a car.
¦ There is evidence that kids can learn from apps. Mobile applications based on PBS KIDS programs were independently evaluated with 90 children aged three to seven who played with them for two weeks. Children made gains in vocabulary comprehension, letter identification, and rhyming after using the apps.
¦ Young children are surprisingly adept at using smart mobile devices. Nearly all the children observed could master operations, even after initial difficulty.

Image placeholder title

From a new report released by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop in collaboration with PBS KIDS Raising Readers and Hotspex.

Featured

Related

Learning: Is there an app for that? promo image

Learning: Is there an app for that?

The explosive growth of mobile media is a current topic of discussion as parents, educators and scholars question whether young children should be using these devices.

Image placeholder title

There’s a Badge For That

Digital badges have captured theimagination of many educators,including those frustrated withcurrent assessment techniquesand practices.

Who Goes There?

From eye-scanning to fingerprinting, biometric technology can help districts keep an eye on the comings and goings at their schools.

iPAd as IWB? There's an app for that

Splashtop® Inc. demonstrated Splashtop Whiteboard, its new iPad app for education, at the 2011 International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Conference in Philadelphia, PA. Splashtop Whiteboard allows teachers and students to turn their iPad into an interactive whiteboard. By