Videoconferencing: What to Wear, What to Do - Tech Learning

Videoconferencing: What to Wear, What to Do

Tip: When I participated in my first videoconference, I did not realize that what I wore could cause audio noise. I wore my favorite shirt — a plaid with red in it. Red and video don’t work well together. If it wasn’t for my dynamic personality this conference might have flopped. Just kidding! I have
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When I participated in my first videoconference, I did not realize that what I wore could cause audio noise. I wore my favorite shirt — a plaid with red in it. Red and video don’t work well together. If it wasn’t for my dynamic personality this conference might have flopped. Just kidding! I have learned the hard way and thought a few tips on preparing and presenting might help you for the next time you participate in a videoconference:

What to wear:

  • Don’t wear plaids, stripes, or lots of patterns. It’s best to wear solid colors.
  • Wear neutral, light, or pastel colors.
  • Stay away from bright colors, especially reds that tends to run on the screen or white which causes audio noise.
  • Don’t wear long earrings or necklaces that make noise.

Participation:

  • Try to stay still and keep gestures to a minimum (this is difficult for me since I talk with my hands).
  • Watch nervous energy such as tapping the table, twisting in your chair, or crinkling any paper.
  • Speak slowly and as naturally as possible with a strong, clear voice.
  • Keep any lecture to less then ten minutes.
  • Mix lectures with interactivity.
  • When you are not talking mute incoming audio to keep unnecessary noise down.
  • Try not to say anything that you do not want the others to hear.
  • Look right into the camera when speaking.

Submitted by:Barbara Bray

Next Tip: Encouraging Interactivity

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