Bill of Rights: You Mean I’ve Got Rights? - Tech Learning

Bill of Rights: You Mean I’ve Got Rights?

Use this great lesson plan about the Bill of Rights to help your students understand the meaning of their rights in language they will understand.
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December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, the day the first ten amendments to the Constitution were finally ratified by the states. Use this great lesson plan about the Bill of Rights to help your students understand the meaning of their rights in language they will understand. It takes just a class period and when your students are finished, they will be ready to play “Do I Have a Right?’”an online game from ICivics athttps://www.icivics.org/games/do-i-have-right. Everything you need is included in the lesson—vocabulary, the cards for the mix and match activity, the original language of the document along with a “translation,” and a final cloze activity.

courtesy of Knovation

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