Don't Let BYOD Stand for "Bring Your Own Disaster" - Tech Learning

Don't Let BYOD Stand for "Bring Your Own Disaster"

A BYOD program requires careful planning, infrastructure investment, and training to succeed.
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A BYOD program requires careful planning, infrastructure investment, and training to succeed. A well-defined framework within your school culture and matching your objectives will go a long way in helping your school develop a BYOD program. BYOD's core appeal is it enables schools to have personalized, one-to-one learning programs with greater student engagement and accountability, but without buying the student hardware, maintaining, or repairing it. However, administrators must first decide what they want -- or need -- to accomplish with these "free" devices. That will help drive what devices will work best in their programs.

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