Four Stomachs: How a Cow Turns Grass to Food

Since June is National Dairy Month, it's a good time to learn why cows can eat grass and people can't. This click through animation helps learners visualise the ruminant digestive system of a cow in a process that is accompanied
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Since June is National Dairy Month, it's a good time to learn why cows can eat grass and people can't. This click-through animation helps learners visualise the ruminant digestive system of a cow in a process that is accompanied by colorful sound effects.

courtesy of netTrekker

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