History Channel: George Washington - Tech Learning

History Channel: George Washington

In July, 1775, George Washington took command of the U.S. troops during the American Revolutionary War.
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In July, 1775, George Washington took command of the U.S. troops during the American Revolutionary War. He was a farmer, surveyor, military general, Founding Father and first President of the United States. History.com offers a collection of video clips, images, and a foundation of biographical information about General Washington. Students will be exposed to the characteristics of the original president, his achievements and his struggles. Washington left a legacy behind him that future Commanders-in-Chief sought after. Some of the video clips included portray Washington at Valley Forge, Washington's Surprise Attack on Trenton, and George Washington's Precedents.

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