PxPixel
Physics To Go: Explore Physics on Your Own - Tech Learning

Physics To Go: Explore Physics on Your Own

Author:
Publish date:

Self-described as being "dedicated to introducing physics topics in a fun and accessible way," this online magazine covers much of what would be covered in any physics curriculum. Worthwhile for the photographs alone, you'll find links to games, webcasts, and activities, as well. Browse for topics or search through the archives and don't miss the Interact page -- here you'll find fascinating photos and a list of as-yet unanswered physics questions.

courtesy of
netTrekker

Featured

Related

Explore Your Knowledge

Explore Your Knowledge The National Center for Education Statistics offers math quizzes for grades 4 and 8, along with some very interesting results comparisons. First take a quiz of 5-20 questions on topics such as fractions, decimals, multiplication, and rounding. Then check to see if your answer was

Physics Simulations

Physics Simulations These interactive simulations provide an excellent framework for understanding various different physics topics, including motion, heat, sound, light, electricity, energy, and quantum phenomena. They're part of the Physics Education Technology project at the University of Colorado.

Make Your Own Temperature Scale

This experiment from Teach Engineering is a hands-on activity that allows students to make their own temperature scale before using that scale to measure temperatures in different places.

Finding Your Own Frog Prince

This Kennedy Center ArtsEdge unit contains a series of lessons that involve students working with the traditional Grimm Brothers' fairy tale, "The Frog Prince."

Fear of Physics

Fear of Physics Your objective is to launch your satellite with the correct speed and to the correct height to achieve orbit. Too slow or too low and you crash! If you go too fast or high, you may lose your satellite into space! This interactive animation is easy to understand and use. Fear of

Sixty Symbols of Physics and Astronomy

 In these videos, astronomy and physics experts at the University of Nottingham explain the strange symbols, letters, and "squiggles" seen in equations and diagrams in textbooks and other materials. Enjoy lively discussions, simple demonstrations, and humorous anecdotes as these scientists