Understanding the Classroom Assessment Gap

8 Important Takeaways for Principals & Administrators
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A recent Tech & Learning survey of over 500 teachers, principals, and district administrators revealed noteworthy disparities between the realities of teachers assessment experiences inside their classrooms and the perceptions of principals and district administrators outside the classroom.

While a certain degree of disconnection is to be expected, particularly given the limited interaction and physical distance common between teachers and district administrators, some of the most striking differences in perception occurred between teachers and principals working together in close proximity.

These gaps in understanding, concerning everything from the type and volume of assessments being administered to the effort and time involved in creating and grading assessments and analyzing the data gathered, can be a challenge, but they offer an opportunity to bring expectations and performance in line with one another.

Click here to download the full white paper, Understanding the Classroom Assessment Gap: Eight Important Takeaways for Principals & Administrators

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