Update Your Acceptable Use Policy This School Year with Guidelines from Consortium of School Networking (CoSN)

One of the great resources available over at the Banned Sites Awareness website is the Acceptable Use Policy Guide from The Consortium of School Networking (CoSN)
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One of the great resources available over at the Banned Sites Awareness website is the Acceptable Use Policy Guide from The Consortium of School Networking (CoSN) which offers administrators guidelines for revising Acceptable Use Policies to reflect the current socio-mobile learning landscape. If you don't know, the Banned Sites Awareness website is filled with information and resources that celebrate the freedom to learn with participatory media in school. This particular resource provides guidelines and examples of various AUPs.

The guidelines address the following topics: 

You can visit the complete guidelines and samples here.

Lisa Nielsen writes for and speaks to audiences across the globe about learning innovatively and is frequently covered by local and national media for her views on “Passion (not data) Driven Learning,” "Thinking Outside the Ban" to harness the power of technology for learning, and using the power of social media to provide a voice to educators and students. Ms. Nielsen has worked for more than a decade in various capacities to support learning in real and innovative ways that will prepare students for success. In addition to her award-winning blog,The Innovative Educator, Ms. Nielsen’s writing is featured in Huffington Post, EdReformer, Tech & Learning, ISTE Connects, ASCD Wholechild,MindShift, Leading & Learning,The Unplugged Mom, and is the author the bookTeaching Generation Text.

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