Caldecott Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1938-Present - Tech Learning

Caldecott Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1938-Present

Caldecott Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1938-Present The American Library Association awards the Caldecott medal for best illustration of children's books. This directory of Caldecott Medal winners and honor books, from 1938 to the present, includes a description of each book.
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Caldecott Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1938-Present


The American Library Association awards the Caldecott medal for best illustration of children's books. This directory of Caldecott Medal winners and honor books, from 1938 to the present, includes a description of each book.

Association for Library Service to Children

• Pictures and/or Illustrations


• Elementary School

Bridget Fesenmeier

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