Sistine Chapel Virtual Tour

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Visit the Sistine Chapel displayed in all its beauty on your computer monitor while you listen to the ethereal voices of a choir singing sacred music of the day. Use your mouse to examine every part of the architecture, and zoom in to appreciate the artistry of Michelangelo. Michelangelo painted the frescoes on the vault of the Chapel over a four year period and revealed his masterpiece on November 1, 1512. Many years later he painted “The Last Judgment” behind the altar at the front of the Chapel. The wall frescoes are often overlooked because of the magnificence of Michelangelo’s work, but they are stunning in themselves.

courtesy of netTrekker

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