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The Very First Labor Day - Tech Learning

The Very First Labor Day

The Very First Labor Day Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is more than the 'end of summer' or another day to catch shopping bargains. It was established to honor the workers of America. A history of our Labor Day celebration is provided on this site by the Library of Congress. America's
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The Very First Labor Day


Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is more than the 'end of summer' or another day to catch shopping bargains. It was established to honor the workers of America. A history of our Labor Day celebration is provided on this site by the Library of Congress.

America's Library, Library of Congress

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