Math video game challenge kicks off - Tech Learning

Math video game challenge kicks off

DimensionU today announced ”DU the Math,” a nationwide campaign designed to get students to play 50 million minutes of math-based video games
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DimensionU today announced ”DU the Math,” a nationwide campaign designed to get students to play 50 million minutes of math-based video games to help develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills.

The campaign kicks off today with registration for the 2012 DU the Math National Scholarship Tournament. The virtual tournament includes five, one-week competitions beginning April 9 and ending May 13. In each of the weekly challenges, students in grades 3-9 can compete – playing the DimensionU video games – for a wide variety of prizes, including a chance to score the top prize of a $25,000 college scholarship.

The DU the Math tournament includes competitions for individuals and for schools across the country. For students playing in the individuals competition, prizes such as an Xbox, iPads, and Amazon.com gift cards will be awarded, in addition to the fan experience prizes. The top three students who answer the most questions correctly during the weekly sessions will qualify for the DU the Math Tournament Finals and Music Festival. The grand prize for individuals is a $25,000 scholarship, with three runner-up prizes of $5,000 scholarships.

For the schools competition, the school that collectively logs the most minutes played will host the DU the Math Finals and Music Festival in its hometown. The festival will feature up-and-coming celebrity musical acts Mindless Behavior and Greyson Chance. The winning school and location will be announced the week of May 14, with the finals slated for June 16, 2012.

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