The Physics Classroom: Skydiving - Tech Learning

The Physics Classroom: Skydiving

This Physics Classroom tutorial provides visuals, informational text, and sample problems worked through to the solution.
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Watch the GIF of an animated skydiver falling from an airplane. As he moves, students observe the motion of the skydiver. As the skydiver falls, he encounters the force of air resistance. Students find out that the amount of air resistance is dependent upon two variables: the speed of the skydiver and the cross-sectional area of the skydiver. This Physics Classroom tutorial provides visuals, informational text, and sample problems worked through to the solution. Students can also access more information through links to corresponding resources.

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