We Are the Freedom Riders

Here’s a great opportunity for music teachers and Social Studies teachers to collaborate in presenting this powerful lesson on the freedom riders of the Civil Rights era.
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Here’s a great opportunity for music teachers and Social Studies teachers to collaborate in presenting this powerful lesson on the freedom riders of the Civil Rights era. Objectives on the Social Studies side ask students to recognize the power that individual and group actions have in changing society and taking responsibility in a democracy. The music teacher can help students understand the power of music itself in history by examining the seminal Civil Rights anthem, “We Shall Overcome.” Use the Music Analysis sheet to help students understand the song before they write additional lyrics for present day. The lesson plan provides ample direction on how to make this a powerful exploration of the activists in the fight for civil rights.

courtesy of Knovation

Featured

Related

The Five Freedoms

The First Amendment Center of Vanderbilt University presents an array of materials relating to the five freedoms of the first amendment of the Constitution speech., press, liberty, assembly, petition. Includes analysis of current events, articles about K 12 students' civil

We Are the Scrub Club

We Are the Scrub Club Show students how to kill disease-causing organisms and thus stay healthy all year long by washing their hands (including under their fingernails) with warm soapy water. They can play the "6 Steps Game" to learn how to properly clean their hands, meet the "villains" that cause

We are the environment

 From the US Department of Health and Human Services, NIEHS Kids provides games, music, and valuable information on issues of health and the environment. Also contains links to other English and Spanish language sites with related themes. courtesy of netTrekker

African American Art

African American Art Here's another great website to help your students celebrate Black History Month. This site showcases one hundred years of African American art achievement . Artwork ranges chronologically from the Civil War era to the Harlem Renaissance, from civil rights struggles to

Band Music from the Civil War Era

Band Music from the Civil War Era "Band Music from the Civil War Era," created by the Library of Congress, is a fascinaing site to explore. It's easy to step back in time when viewing pictures of mustached, patriotic soldiers grouped together in their bands while listening to the lively military

Voices of Civil Rights(2)

A joint project of AARP, the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR), and the Library of Congress, Voices of Civil Rights provides a  place for people to share their experiences of the turbulent beginnings of the civil rights movement as